The Creative Mind: Q&A with Contemporary Artist Bosco Sodi

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Mexican painter Bosco Sodi works in the tradition of Abstract Expressionism, creating large-scale canvases that evoke a scorched, cracked earth in a variety of vivid colors. By constructing a conversation between himself as artist and the raw materials he employs, Sodi infuses an effusive spirituality in his pieces. He also values the emotional power of his art: “I think painting at this time has a big responsibility to help people to heal and to show people that life is impermanent.” You live and work in a number of places: New York, Mexico City, Barcelona, Berlin. How does all this moving around influence your art? I try to find in my work as much as possible things that I cannot control. I like to move from studio to studio because the environment in each studio is completely different: the weather, the humidity, even the sawdust in each studio is different because it comes from different wood or different suppliers. Even if I travel with pigments from one place to another, the outcome of the painting is completely different if I do it in New York or Berlin because when I mix the pigments with the sawdust, it makes a slightly different color, or the cracking is different because of the weather. So that’s why I like to maintain different studios because I’m very interested in this kind of influence by the environment of the place. How did you develop the cracking process in which you make your paintings? The way I approach art is that it’s very much about the process, about the researching. I was producing my old paintings—they didn’t have as much texture as these ones—and one day I was researching and I left out a big quantity of this material that I use normally. I found it very interesting how it began to crack and how I lost control of the painting completely. This part that you don’t control—it’s ruled by nature, by other forces, not by the artist. Since you prefer to let the painting happen organically,
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